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Soldier

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Reply with quote  #1 
Don't know if it has been discussed or not but all these Juvenile diabetes commercials got me thinking about a SHTF scenario. I have family members with diabetes (type 1 and 2) and they rely heavily on either man-made or natural insulin injected daily or they could go into a coma and die. As far as I know it can be managed through diet to a point but in an end of the world scenario these people would be doomed IMO:
1. They can't get a hold of the natural foods that could possibly keep their blood sugar regulated in a "scavenge and eat whatever you can" post-apocalyptic world.
2. I'm sure that insulin viles and clean syringes would be unobtainable after a certain amount of time (6 months or so?).
So what do you think guys? Any input?

PS: I don't mean to offend anybody if I do just got curious about other people's input on the subject.

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cleopori2001

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Reply with quote  #2 
The body regulates it's glucose levels from the pancreas through the endocrine system by secreting insulin or glucagon from the islets of langerhans.  Insulin is secreted when the glucose levels get too high, and glucagon is screted when glucose levels get too low.

Type 1 diabetes results from the body's failure to produce insulin, and presently requires the person to inject insulin. (Also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, IDDM for short, and juvenile diabetes.)

Type 2 diabetes results from insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to use insulin properly, sometimes combined with an absolute insulin deficiency. (Formerly referred to as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM for short, and adult-onset diabetes.)

I can tell you that type two diabetes is completly severe when it comes to insulin. If you become resistant to insulin it can be bad. On the other hand, I am very confident that someone with type two diabetes can correct their condition through malnutrition. The reason is because even though your body is having trouble producing insulin, it still can have the capability to produce glucagon. So, if the blood glucose levels are low,  then the body can correct it with the other hormone in the pancreas.

With your theory, you are half right, and half wrong. However, the 123 scenario is most likely true.
Raccoon_City_Survivor

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Reply with quote  #3 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cleopori2001
I can tell you that type two diabetes is completly severe when it comes to insulin. If you become resistant to insulin it can be bad. On the other hand, I am very confident that someone with type two diabetes can correct their condition through malnutrition. The reason is because even though your body is having trouble producing insulin, it still can have the capability to produce glucagon. So, if the blood glucose levels are low,  then the body can correct it with the other hormone in the pancreas.

Good info.  My mom has Type Two and I've always wondered what would happen.


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John_Brian_K

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My dad has diabetes, but I have no idea what stage.  He regulates it with diet so I think he would be fine.....and when I say 'fine' I mean no worries about the diabetes.  He is in his 70's and gets around real well for his age, but come on, if zombies were after him he would be dinner.


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Dec 09, 2009 at 10:18 AM
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"Something my granddad used to tell us. You know Macumba? Voodoo. My granddad was a priest in Trinidad. He used to tell us, "When there's no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth."
RedneckZombieHunter

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Reply with quote  #5 

Not only this but alot of other medical conditions that require regual doses of medicne to keep alive, very scary stuff.


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Soldier

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Reply with quote  #6 
Awesome RZH, that's what I was thinking about and hoped we would eventually get to on this topic. Ex: HIV/AIDS, cancer, STDs(usually not fatal but sure would make your life miserable if you couldn't treat it) those are all big ones but what about little stuff like:
I, personally, wear glasses. What happens if they break? What about people who need hearing aids, people with asthma controlled by an inhaler, people with chronic migraines or spider migraines? What about the #1 most common problem affecting Americans today, obesity?
And no the answer isn't Darwinism, unless you're obese in which case you're boned. See ZombieLand


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alex51

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Reply with quote  #7 
All interesting points. Makes me think of all the other stuff that could kill you with out the simple medications we take for granted.
  On the other hand the long term survivors would probably be the fittest and therefore the best chance for future generations of healthier mankind. If your looking at the long term big picture.
  Another alternative would be the study of natural remedies  which might be the answer to a lot of simple crap that might kill you if gone untreated. 

I would like to hear our resident Doc Panic's view on this one. 

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DocT

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier
Don't know if it has been discussed or not but all these Juvenile diabetes commercials got me thinking about a SHTF scenario. I have family members with diabetes (type 1 and 2) and they rely heavily on either man-made or natural insulin injected daily or they could go into a coma and die. As far as I know it can be managed through diet to a point but in an end of the world scenario these people would be doomed IMO:
1. They can't get a hold of the natural foods that could possibly keep their blood sugar regulated in a "scavenge and eat whatever you can" post-apocalyptic world.
2. I'm sure that insulin viles and clean syringes would be unobtainable after a certain amount of time (6 months or so?).
So what do you think guys? Any input?

PS: I don't mean to offend anybody if I do just got curious about other people's input on the subject.


If one is obese and has type 2, weight loss as a result of the severe diet would affect their disease and possibly free them from pills and/or shots. One of the finalists in the recent Biggest Loser show is a example of this affect. 

Average Type 2 adults as mentioned in a earlier email may also survive depending on the severity of their diabetes and their specific diet.

IMHO, Type 1 cases are probably screwed. They have six months of life at most as insulin needs to be stored refrigerated, but it will age even if kept cool.  All insulin is "man-made" in the sense that someone has to package the product, but I think you were referring to home-made insulin. I suppose this is possible. 

If you think your family may need it, then research it and prepare by getting a process written down, determining the equipment needs and noting sources for the equipment (e.g. local hospitable or medical supplies distributor). I also seem to remember you will need a few live pigs for home-made stuff. 

People with other pill needs may survive if they can find the pills somewhere. Long term, these products will lose their potency, so people will probably die in their own good time. Think pre-civil war medical diagnosis and treatment. Cancer, heart/lung disease and severe blood infections (i.e. no antibiotics except certain plants used for surface skin wounds) will kill many...

I am a overweight Type 2 diabetic and hope the disease does not take me so fast so as to prevent me from getting my extended family, especially the kids, situated to surviving the coming years of hardship.



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panic

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Reply with quote  #9 
Type I diabetics will die in relatively short order without insulin.  There's just no real way around it.  Brittle Type I diabetics may die within days of running out of properly refrigerated insulin.

Younger, otherwise healthy Type II diabetics may last long enough for the weight loss and rigorous physical demands of the PAW to actually improve their insulin sensitivity and thus  make their diabetes less severe.  If this happens, they may live a more normal lifespan...

Older and/or sicker Type II diabetics are screwed, although not as immediately so as Type I diabetics.

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